Today is National Drug Take-Back Day: Take Action!

Today is National Drug Take-Back Day, a day where anyone, anywhere in the US can go to a location and safely dispose of prescription drugs. If you have any painkillers, opioids/opiates, sedatives or anti-anxiety drugs that have been sitting in your cabinet, do the right thing and find a location to dispose of your unused medications safely. You might safe a life! You can also get rid of conventional drugs such as antibiotics by visiting one of the locations. Why Dispose of Drugs on National Take-Back Day? During most of the year, it's nearly impossible to dispose to dispose of any addictive drugs safely. Pharmacies don't want the liability when dealing with opioids and other dangerous drugs, so they won't let you return them. Flushing them or throwing them away can contribute to tainting the water, soil, and environment. Don't do it! Future generations certainly don't need the added worry of addictive substances in the water. There is also the worry that if you throw the drugs in the…

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Purdue Pharma Says It Will Cease Marketing OxyContin

Purdue Pharma, one of the largest manufacturers of Oxycontin in America, has vowed to stop marketing the opioid to doctors. Oxycontin is an opioid medication that has been on the market for over 20 years and is viewed by many addiction and law enforcement professionals to be the catalyst for America’s current opioid addiction crisis. It’s a common drug of abuse and is often responsible for overdoses. Purdue released a statement saying that it would no longer send sales representatives to market the opioid painkiller at doctor’s offices and that the Medical Affairs office will now handle all Oxycontin orders and queries. Many people involved in the addiction industry, the medical community and other public heatlh experts say it’s too little, too late. Purdue has long marketed Oxycontin as effective and safe for use, dropping off samples at the offices of practitioners and telling physicians that it was ideal for treating chronic pain. While these statements weren’t proven, medical marketing is an industry that often finds the loopholes. Purdue…

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FDA Says Kratom is Not Safe

FDA Says Kratom is Not Safe
A kratom leaf c/o YayImage.com

The FDA recently issued a warning that Kratom isn’t a safe way to withdraw from Oxycontin or other opioids -- or use for pain management. The plant that has been consumed for thousands of years by indigenous people, has made its way to America via the internet, marketed as a cure for opioid addiction, pain, and over a dozen other maladies that have normally been treated with pharmaceutical medication. One of the most storied uses of Kratom, however, is that it was once used as a “substitute” in East Asian countries during the opium epidemic. Users of the drug don’t believe that Kratom is not safe and tout the benefits of daily usage. Sure, some people use it heavily and experience withdrawal, they will admit, but this is no worse than caffeine withdrawal. Last year, the Drug Enforcement Administration tried to temporarily place the main psychoactive component found in Kratom into the schedule I category of the Controlled Substances Act, only to get a large amount of pushback from chronic…

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Courts to Decide: Are Pharm Companies Misrepresenting Opiates As “Safe”?

On Tuesday, October 6, 2015, The Suffolk County, New York unanimously voted to sue drug manufacturers for what they call misrepresentation by pharmaceutical companies that the powerful opiates they prescribe are “safe and non-addictive,” according to an article in Newsday.   The county joins the growing ranks of public officials working to hold drug manufacturers accountable for a growing epidemic of opiate drug addiction in America. The legislatures say that the 90% upswing in heroin-related deaths from the years 2000 to 2012 is part of an epidemic of opiate abuse that originates with prescription drug addiction. Legislative representative Rob Calarco, from Patchogue, NY sponsored the bill. Calerco said that drug manufacturers have "misrepresented" to doctors that opioid drugs are safe to treat chronic pain – as well as non-addictive. Legislator William Spencer, from Centerport, is a physician who is president of the Suffolk Medical Society. He supports the lawsuit and said manufacturers have pressured doctors to recommend the drugs to patients. "We were literally told that these (drugs) were…

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Oxycodone and Hydrocodone: Use, Abuse and Treatment.

Oxycodone and hydrocodone, two similar sounding generic prescription drugs, are narcotic pain medications that are being abused at epidemic levels in the United States and Canada. Oxycodone, which is sold under the brand name OxyContin and used in Percocet and Percodan, is a powerful analgesic designed specifically for severe pain disorders. It has highly addictive properties. Hydrocodone, which is an ingredient in Vicodin, is another painkiller that is frequently prescribed for moderate to severe pain for everything from toothaches to backaches. Both medications are subject to abuse and may cause fatal overdose when mixed with alcohol, other drugs or when taken in amounts exceeding recommended dosages. OxyContin is a time-released formula of oxycodone that was introduced in 1995 as a Schedule II drug. It is a synthetic opioid that is very similar to morphine. OxyContin gained national attention in 2003 when conservative radio talk host Rush Limbaugh admitted that he was addicted to it. Since then, detox centers and pain management specialists have focused on helping patients withdraw from…

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Are You or is Someone You Love Abusing Prescription Drugs?

Drug abuse is a very serious and dangerous problem. When many people think of drug abuse, they're picturing illicit drugs like heroin, cocaine or methamphetamine. Another very real form of drug abuse is prescription drug abuse. Prescription drug abuse, to be put simply, is taking a prescription medication that is either not prescribed by a doctor or taken in a way other than prescribed. Prescription drug abuse cuts across a wide segment of the population, from Hollywood celebrities to the kids taking pills from the family medicine cabinet. OxyContin is the prescription drug that receives the most press coverage, but many other drugs that are also being abused. It could almost be said that if a drug is available under prescription, someone has tried to abuse it. Most Abused Drugs and Methods of Abuse These are the three main categories of prescription drugs that are routinely abused: Opioid Painkillers – includes oxycodone (OxyContin), hydrocodone (Vicodin), oxymorphone (Opana) Depressants – includes alprazolam (Xanax), diazepam (Valium) Stimulants – includes amphetamines (Adderall),…

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New Mexico Drug Problems

Recently in New Mexico the battle against drug related deaths has become more difficult than ever. New Mexico has the highest drug overdose death rate in the entire nation. This high death rate may be partially due to the fact that the state’s funds and attention have been focused on prevention of other substances of abuse. Alcoholism and heroin addiction have haunted the state for years, but the drug of choice by addicted individuals has recently switched to prescription drugs. Awareness activism and law enforcement have lagged behind this trend. In a span just short of 10 years the drug overdose rate has jumped 60% in New Mexico, with the majority being prescription drug related. Prescription drug overdose rates now outnumber that of all other This epidemic in New Mexico is especially worrisome due to the fact that it doesn't affect one small facet of the population. Prescription drug abuse spans socio-economic, race, gender, and age barriers. There seems to be no end in sight. Not only do many…

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Appalachian Pillbillies

Appalachia is the cultural region that stretches along the famous Appalachian Mountain Trail. If you visit this area, the verdant rolling hills and breathtaking natural landscapes are hard to miss. However, when one looks beneath the beautiful facade, one uncovers a debilitating and dark pattern of widespread prescription drug abuse. Although prescription drug abuse is not an uncommon in other areas around the world, addiction to natural or synthetic opioids or painkillers (such as oxycodone, morphine, codeine, methadone, among others) has reached unprecedented levels in Appalachia. The abuse is so widespread that, in fact, a new term has been coined solely to describe those addicted: pillbillies. Why are Opiates So Popular in Appalachia? The high rate of addiction in Appalachia is thought to be caused in part by the pervasive poverty of the area, where the poverty rate is three times the national rate. Unfortunately, the high poverty rate both causes and is caused by the higher frequency of prescription drug abuse. Those who are addicted have trouble maintaining…

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On the Dangers of Teen OxyNEO Abuse

Teen prescription drug use is a disturbing trend that has drifted beyond the boundaries of parental control and government order. A compelling documentary has been released called "Behind the Orange Curtain," which chronicles the prescription drug abuse of residents of Orange County’s wealthy neighborhoods. The prestigious community has been bombarded with incidences of teenagers overdosingon a variety of prescription pills in pursuit of drug- induced pleasure. One of the most popular preferences for teenage drug abuse is the infamous OxyContin tablet. Medically distributed as a highly potent pain reducer, OxyContin offers an expensive high for thrill seekers and is extremely addictive. One may experience a number of side effects from using the drug, but deadly results can occur when it is consumed with alcohol. This often causes a serious problem for young adults who often combine prescription drugs with liquor at parties. According to recent reports, OxyContin frequently leads individuals to seek harsher drugs, specifically heroin. Purdue Pharma, the manufacturer of the drug OxyContin, even redesigned the drug and…

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Prescription for Death – The Transition from Oxy to Heroin

The leading cause of accidental death in the United States is prescription drug abuse. Prescription drugs are responsible for more deaths than heroin and cocaine combined, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Painkillers like OxyNEO which contains oxycodone, are actually derived from the opium poppy. They are just as addictive as their heroin. People that would never dream of doing heroin, are okay with taking a pill - especially one that comes from a doctor. That's one of the reasons so many have become addicted to opioids in the past decade. They seem harmless in the beginning. OxyNEO is meant to be a continuous release drug, and has some very sophisticated ingredients which make it difficult to abuse (by crushing up to snort or inject). OxyNEO's predecessor OxyContin was commonly crushed up to facilitate getting a massive dose of the narcotic painkiller immediately. Crushing up OxyContin would break the binding agent, allowing them to get the full dose of the drug. You could snort it, eat…

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